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New TechDas Armwand for Graham Phantom Elite Tonearm

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  • New TechDas Armwand for Graham Phantom Elite Tonearm

    PHANTOM Elite Upgrade arm wand for tone arm wand (10 inch type)
    Titanium tone arm wand TDTW - 01 Ti
    Extraordinarily high rigidity tone arm wand by integral processing of pure titanium material subjected to special hardening treatment
    We have developed the pure titanium upgrade · tone arm pipe "TDTW - 01Ti" for the tone arm PHANTOM Elite made by Graham, with all the power of metal processing technology possessed by Stella raised. We fully comply with PHANTOM Elite 10 inch.

    In order to accurately take out the music signal carved in the groove of the record, it is required to securely receive the cartridge with a highly rigid tone arm. However, materials with higher rigidity than ordinary aluminum pipes have large masses, so the mass of inertia becomes large, resulting in unstable operation such as low-frequency resonance due to synergistic effect with cartridges. Therefore, TDTW-01Ti adopted pure titanium material which is lightweight and high in rigidity, and further subjected to surface special curing treatment.

    In addition, by cutting the tip of the arm pipe close to the cartridge to be thin, the fulcrum side of the tone arm is thick, cutting into a tapered pipe shape reduces the inertial mass of the tip and increases the overall rigidity. We have cleared the contradictory requirements of inertial mass and rigidity. In addition, seamless loss is eliminated entirely by seamless integral processing. We are trying to raise further rigidity.

    The low string of the contrabass and the low string of the piano which were mixed in unison. Furthermore, even the floor of the hall clearly separates. The singing voice of the vocalists supported by the low region, the region that grows everywhere, firmly glossy midrange. Extremely delicate high region which is not added anything. Even though it is energetic, there has never been taste so far, a detailed sound of each instrument and breathing. Please enjoy the excitement of the music that rushes like anger.

    * Since the finger attached to the shell part can be removed easily, please remove the unnecessary one. Also, since the sub weights are included, please install it on the tone arm rear part according to the cartridge to be installed.

    Price: Probably around $5200.
    Specifications
    Dimensions Length: 223 mm Width: 32 mm (including fingers) Height: 20 mm
    Weight 54 g Accessories Subweight
    2 types
    Myles B. Astor, PhD, Administrator
    Senior Editor, Positive-Feedback.com
    ________________________________________

    -Zellaton Plural Evo speakers
    -Goldmund Telos 300 stereo amp
    -Goldmund Mimesis 37S Nextgen preamplifier
    -Doshi EVO and Goldmund PH3.8 phonostage
    -VPI Vanquish direct-drive turntable
    -VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy dual pivot tonearm, VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy gimballed and SAT LM-12 arm
    -Lyra Atlas SL Lambda, Fuuga Mk. 2, vdh Colibri Master Signature, MutechHayabusa, MOFI Master Tracker, Sumiko Songbird cartridges
    -Technics RS1506 with Flux Magnetic heads, Doshi V3.0 tape stage (balanced)
    -Assorted cables including Transparent XL Gen. 6, Skogrand, Viero, Kubala-Sosna, Audience Au24SX, Genesis Advanced Technologies and Ensemble Power Cords
    -Accessories including Stillpoint Aperture panels, Cathedral Sound panels, Furutech NCF Nano AC receptacles; Silver Circle Tchaik 6 PLC, Symposium ISIS and SRA Craz 3 racks, Audiodharma Cable Cooker, Symposium Ultra and assorted SRA OHIO Class 2.1+ platforms.

  • #2
    That better be a MAGIC Wand for $5200. Amazing how the Phantom keeps getting refinements.
    [TURNTABLE] TW Acustic Raven One [TONEARM] Dynavector DV 507Mkii & Graham Phantom [PHONO] BAT VK-P10 & Dynavector PHA200; [CARTRIDGE] Dynavector XV1S, Lyra Kleos, Ortofon Cadenza Mono [TAPE] Otari MTR15 & Technics RS1500 with JRF Headblock [DIGITAL] Grace Design M920, Lynx Auroa 8 ADC/DAC, Mac Mini with roon labs [PRAMP] McIntosh C2300 [AMP] McIntosh C601s [SPEAKERS] Legacy Audio Whisper & Wavelet [ACC] Klaudio Ultrasonic RCM

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not excited at that price. I imagine the high price is due to the difficulty and cost to machine titanium...like the platter option.
      Christian
      System Gear

      Comment


      • Garth
        Garth commented
        Editing a comment
        And what is it you own that is not high priced

    • #4
      According to TD the high prices have more to do with the external hardening process than the machining which they say is a lot easier nowadays. They use a process similar to but more extreme than the DLC precesses we find in some of our watches. Nishikawa-san said that the problem with Titanium is that it scratches rather easily. Having seen the scratches on my driver faces (golf) I don't disagree. It is a sight to see in person though. I would like to try one as I am out of spare wands.....AGAIN! Arghhh!

      Comment


      • MylesBAstor
        MylesBAstor commented
        Editing a comment
        As they say, too many cartridges is just enough! ❤️

      • JackD201
        JackD201 commented
        Editing a comment
        'Tis a disease with no cure!

    • #5
      Originally posted by JackD201 View Post
      According to TD the high prices have more to do with the external hardening process than the machining which they say is a lot easier nowadays. They use a process similar to but more extreme than the DLC precesses we find in some of our watches. Nishikawa-san said that the problem with Titanium is that it scratches rather easily. Having seen the scratches on my driver faces (golf) I don't disagree. It is a sight to see in person though. I would like to try one as I am out of spare wands.....AGAIN! Arghhh!
      Jack-Since titanium is so damn hard which is why it's used in aerospace applications, I'm surprised it needs to have any further hardening. You have to use titanium drill bits to drill through titanium. Low speed, heavy feed. It's a bitch to work with.
      Micro Seiki SX-8000 table with flywheel, SME 3012R arm, SME 312S arm, Lyra Etna SL and Dynavector XV-1S cartridges, ARC Ref 3 phono stage, Otari MX-55 tape deck, Ampex 350 repros, Roon Nucleus Plus server, PS Audio DSJ DAC, ARC Ref 6 pre, ARC Ref 75 amp, JBL 4345 speakers, and Def Tech Ref subs.

      Comment


      • #6
        seems a bargin compared to the headshell

        Comment


        • #7
          I believe what they mean is that the oxide layer that forms is easily scuffed/scratched. This shows up more readily than other metals in the contrast between the dark oxide and shiny metal. While I have no isea of the specifics my guess would be that the process applies a coating that prevents the oxidation.

          Next on the list would be a Tungsten carbide wand. Would be pretty hard to scratch that! How about a wand or platter made from diamond? Could use a vapor deposition method to coat a seed unit if you didn't want to go whole hog!!!

          Originally posted by mep View Post

          Jack-Since titanium is so damn hard which is why it's used in aerospace applications, I'm surprised it needs to have any further hardening. You have to use titanium drill bits to drill through titanium. Low speed, heavy feed. It's a bitch to work with.
          Turntable: - 1. Fairchild 750/OMA slate plinth
          2. Analog Engineering AE-2008 MinusK support.
          Tonearm: 1. Schroder Custom
          2. Schick 12"
          3. Abis SA-1
          Cartridge: Miyajima Kansui and Premium BE Mono
          PhonoPre: AprilSound LR, EMIA Strain Gauge, EMIA silver SUT
          CD: Wadia 860x
          Server: Innuos Zen Mini Mk3
          DAC: Computer Audio Design 1543 Mk2
          Preamp: Bent Audio TAP-X w silver autoformers
          Amplifier: AprilSound SET50 monoblocks
          Speaker: Pioneer PAX-30C

          Comment


          • #8
            Originally posted by Beaur View Post
            I believe what they mean is that the oxide layer that forms is easily scuffed/scratched. This shows up more readily than other metals in the contrast between the dark oxide and shiny metal. While I have no isea of the specifics my guess would be that the process applies a coating that prevents the oxidation.

            Next on the list would be a Tungsten carbide wand. Would be pretty hard to scratch that! How about a wand or platter made from diamond? Could use a vapor deposition method to coat a seed unit if you didn't want to go whole hog!!!


            You could be right. The Russian Alfa class of submarines had pressure hulls made of titanium. Nobody was worried about the surface finish looks.
            Micro Seiki SX-8000 table with flywheel, SME 3012R arm, SME 312S arm, Lyra Etna SL and Dynavector XV-1S cartridges, ARC Ref 3 phono stage, Otari MX-55 tape deck, Ampex 350 repros, Roon Nucleus Plus server, PS Audio DSJ DAC, ARC Ref 6 pre, ARC Ref 75 amp, JBL 4345 speakers, and Def Tech Ref subs.

            Comment


            • Rust
              Rust commented
              Editing a comment
              Funny thing about those Alpha sub hulls. For whatever reason, welded seams, properties of the titanium itself, each dive to maximum depth stressed the hull in such a manner that the maximum depth was decreased for the next dive. Much like aluminum where stress is cumulative when approaching the limits of elasticity.

          • #9
            Originally posted by mep View Post

            Jack-Since titanium is so damn hard which is why it's used in aerospace applications, I'm surprised it needs to have any further hardening. You have to use titanium drill bits to drill through titanium. Low speed, heavy feed. It's a bitch to work with.
            Like I said my friend, scratch resistance.

            Comment


            • #10
              Originally posted by JackD201 View Post

              Like I said my friend, scratch resistance.
              I get it now.
              Micro Seiki SX-8000 table with flywheel, SME 3012R arm, SME 312S arm, Lyra Etna SL and Dynavector XV-1S cartridges, ARC Ref 3 phono stage, Otari MX-55 tape deck, Ampex 350 repros, Roon Nucleus Plus server, PS Audio DSJ DAC, ARC Ref 6 pre, ARC Ref 75 amp, JBL 4345 speakers, and Def Tech Ref subs.

              Comment


              • #11
                This thing rocks.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Originally posted by JackD201 View Post
                  This thing rocks.
                  Care to share more? ☄️
                  Myles B. Astor, PhD, Administrator
                  Senior Editor, Positive-Feedback.com
                  ________________________________________

                  -Zellaton Plural Evo speakers
                  -Goldmund Telos 300 stereo amp
                  -Goldmund Mimesis 37S Nextgen preamplifier
                  -Doshi EVO and Goldmund PH3.8 phonostage
                  -VPI Vanquish direct-drive turntable
                  -VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy dual pivot tonearm, VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy gimballed and SAT LM-12 arm
                  -Lyra Atlas SL Lambda, Fuuga Mk. 2, vdh Colibri Master Signature, MutechHayabusa, MOFI Master Tracker, Sumiko Songbird cartridges
                  -Technics RS1506 with Flux Magnetic heads, Doshi V3.0 tape stage (balanced)
                  -Assorted cables including Transparent XL Gen. 6, Skogrand, Viero, Kubala-Sosna, Audience Au24SX, Genesis Advanced Technologies and Ensemble Power Cords
                  -Accessories including Stillpoint Aperture panels, Cathedral Sound panels, Furutech NCF Nano AC receptacles; Silver Circle Tchaik 6 PLC, Symposium ISIS and SRA Craz 3 racks, Audiodharma Cable Cooker, Symposium Ultra and assorted SRA OHIO Class 2.1+ platforms.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Unabashed fan of this wonderful tonearm. But I’m becoming a bit less and less a fan of these so pricey tweaks. I concede, we are talking High-End audio. Though I believe that performance/cost return must be rapidly diminishing and I for one, still retain an eye for value. Too, realizing this design is indeed aging, but I can’t resist asking, does it really need enhanced stiffness to aid in its play performance??? Hmmm
                    Living-Listening room 1340sq ft and modestly lively: Brinkmann Balance w/RöNT II PS, HRS, Reed P3-12 >Miyajima Zero, Graham Phantom III >DynaVector Te Kaitora Rua, Avid Acutus SP, SME V w/Kondo fairyhair silver litz >Lyra Kleos, Nakamichi ZX-7, SCD-XA5400ES, Aesthetix Rhea Signatures, Nordost TYR Norse 2 phono cable and interconnects, Zavfino 1877PHONO Graphene Gold Rush phono cable, Silent Source Music Ref/Shunyata Denali 6000S v2(x2), Alpha & Delta XC v2, Venom NR, CX Anaconda/Elrod EPS-3 Sign mains, Atma-Sphere MP1 3.3 & MA1 Mk.3.3 OTL Silver Edition monoblocks, Classic Audio T3.4 full voice-coiled, Yamamoto racks, SMARTractor. 57 to 64 valves between the source and the speakers. [|;^)>

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      What would be the cost if the whole Phantom arm were manufactured and assembled by TechDAS/Stella? I wonder if the entire arm pipe/tube could have been tapered without the three sections similar to the magnesium SME tube or carbon fiber SAT tube. It looks like individual sections that have been bonded together. Is there an advantage to having separate arm wands instead of separate headshells? It seems as though Graham is one of the few companies that sell separate wands.
                      System link: https://www.whatsbestforum.com/threa...l-sound.32867/
                      Micro Seiki SX8000 II, SME 3012R, vdH Colibri GC 0.25 mV
                      Lamm LP2.1 Deluxe, Lamm LL1 Signature, Lamm ML2.
                      Vitavox CN-191 corner horns, NOS cables, Ching Cheng power cords

                      Comment


                      • Rob
                        Rob commented
                        Editing a comment
                        the SME arm tube is pressure cast in a mold and the Graham milled from solid billet. cast is inherently weaker than milled form solid. either technique is probably overkill for audio proposes but it goes some way to justify the Phantoms cost. Ti is also brittle and more difficult to machine, until just a few decades ago it was prohibitively expense for any consumer item to use Ti.

                    • #15
                      Hi Rob, it is expensive, more than double the cost of an extra Graham wand. Now I love Bob but it did take me the better part of a year to get my extra wands. He tries his best but he is a victim of his own, well deserved success. So what is a Graham Elite owner to do when a better looking, better assembled (tolerances are very tight), more rigid option becomes available quickly? Well, I gave it a try and the gains were easy to hear. Did it render the original wand unlistenable? Of course not...but...I am now looking at the remaining mounted wands in an altered way.

                      Hi Myles! Having the SAT mounted on the same table has given me a better idea of what rigidity brings to the table, pun intended.Swapping TD-Ti's one on a stock and one on an aftermarket TD, confirms to me what Gomes has been espousing. One would think stiff would sound, well, stiff. It's the opposite. There's actually better flow, envelopes are just that little bit better formed, highs more extended while being less etchy which I guess is due to how much more snug the arm is on the turret. Lubrication is needed on the TD while the stock just goes straight on and the play is obvious. I think the midbass down might be a matter of preference. The original is warmer, the TD more tuneful and direct. TD wins on clean extension down to below 20Hz. In a nutshell, it brings the Elite closer to the SAT in character. No surprise that TD would do this. TD has its house sound and the mother company represents both Graham and SAT.

                      Hi Peter, it is tapered from headshell to the end of the tube on one piece. Towards the bass is a sleeve for the locking screw. I thought it was 3 sections too. Apparently it was shaped to respect the look of the original which I do think is very handsome.

                      Comment


                      • PeterA
                        PeterA commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks Jack. You answered many questions in that response. I appreciate it.

                      • JackD201
                        JackD201 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I wish I could have offered more at this point Peter. As always, you are most welcome.
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