Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Reel-to-Reel Tape vs. Direct-to-Disc

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Reel-to-Reel Tape vs. Direct-to-Disc

    Click image for larger version  Name:	atmlp3108-45c.jpg Views:	0 Size:	104.4 KB ID:	115855
    Battle of the behemeths.

    The winner is? You be the judge!
    This item not eligible for any further discount offers! Limited Edition 180g 45rpm LP! Take The Direct-To-Disc Versus Tape-To-Disc Challenge! Only 300 Units Pressed On Initial Run! The Challenge LP 45rpm 180gram disc will take the same three songs recorded on two different takes within 30 minutes of one another. Everything else is the same–but on one side you will hear the Direct-To-Disc version and on the other side you will hear the tape to vinyl version. The songs are 1) Goody Goody; 2) Love Letters; and 3) Bye Bye Blackbird. Not only will you hear the slight variations in the takes but you will also be able to make your own assessment of the quality of both analog recording techniques. Limited pressing non-numbered. To clarify, this 45rpm single LP has the SAME three songs on each side from two different takes recorded within 30 minutes of each other. The reel to reel was captured at the same moment the metal lacquer master was receiving the recording information on the lathe at Bernie Grundman's Mastering Studio. Here are the tests you can perform with this Challenge LP: 1. Sound difference between 45rpm/180 gram Metal Lacquer Mastered analog Direct-To-Disc versus Studio captured traditional analog Reel-To-Reel version made into a vinyl record (Tape-To-Disc). 2. Track take differences between two complete three song takes of Side C's songs in the album London With A Twist-LIVE at Bernie's. 3. If you have London With A Twist-LIVE at Bernie's album, you can compare red vinyl versus black vinyl for sound differences. One of the sides on the Challenge LP is in the regular album. Lyn Stanley has been awarded Female Jazz Vocalist of The Year 2018 from one of the most visible public radio stations in the USA, KKJz-Los Angeles who have the highest Nielsen ratings for jazz radio audiences in the U.S. Mr. Levine notes that Ms. Stanley's recordings ...are a revival of some of the greatest hits ever produced for Broadway Shows and Hollywood movies. They are chestnuts deserving to be reintroduced to the America public. The great American Songbook lives again with the added benefit of 'State Of The Art' recording techniques thanks to Lyn Stanley. About London With A Twist - Live At Bernie's: Part two of jazz recording artist Lyn Stanley's Julie London tirbute project is a very rare Direct to Disc Live album with LA's top Jazz players who named themselves the Jazz Mavericks. Featuring Otmaro Ruiz (piano), Mike Lang (piano), Chuck Berghofer (bass), Aaron Serfaty (drums), John Chiodini (guitar) and Luis Conte (percussion), the Jazz Mavericks created arrangements for incredibly creative music plus over the top sound from the best engineers in LA. While both Lyn and London could be described as sultry and sophisticated singers, the album is an appreciation, not an imitation of London's material selections. Stanley puts her own distinctive stamp on the material London performed and has decided to include some of Julie London's husband's works as well as pop songs that set a lively pace to a live album. Songs include: Route 66, written by Julie London's second husband, Bobby Troup, Let There Be Love, Body and Soul, Pink Cadillac, You Never Can Tell, Lover Man, Bye Bye Blackbird and many more. In addition to acclaim for her velvety alto, choice of material, and her unique and personal approach to songs, Stanley's attention to detail in the studio has garnered raves. This recording utilizes the best possible lathe in Los Angeles, tracked at Bernie Grundman Mastering studio in Hollywood. The ever so fastidious mastering guru, Bernie Grundman, commandeered the coveted Grundman studio lathe. In addition, Bernie's long time associate and fellow audiophile, world famous multi-Grammy winning engineer, Allen Sides ensured the highest quality sound and mixing. Allen has engineered over 1,000 records with major studio artists selling over one billion records, including Joni Mitchell's Both Sides Now. Allen was also supported by Capitol Studios top engineer, Steve Genewick. Lyn can be counted on to surround herself in the studio with the crème de la crème of musicians. For this venture, she aims for the intimate sound of piano, bass, drums/percussion, and guitar. Lyn has engaged Arturo Sandoval's long time extraordinary pianist, Otmaro Ruiz, along with her previous collaborators including legendary studio jazz pianist Mike Lang, Wrecking Crew and Frank Sinatra's bassist Chuck Berghofer, plus featured guitarist John Chiodini (Peggy Lee and Natalie Cole), percussionist Luis Conte (James Taylor touring artist) and award winning Latin percussionist/drummer, Aaron Serfaty. While speaking of the album Lyn says You have to be into the musical moment. There's pressure on everyone-me, the musicians-we have to be totally prepared. But it's a great format if we execute it well. I plan to let the real experience of a live recording happen, even the countdowns, so my fans can feel like they are live with us in the studio lounge. Features: • Limited Initial Run Of 300 Units • 180g Vinyl LP • 45rpm • Recorded live at Bernie Grundman's Mastering Studio, Hollywood, CA, January 19-20, 2019 • This album is a live recording, no alterations have been made to any part • No Auto-Tune, ProTools or Melodyne • Two live-consecutive three song takes from Side C of London With A Twist Direct-To-Disc 12 song album • One full take on Sides A & B of this disc • Disc Mastering by Bernie Grundman • Recording & Mixing Engineer: Allen Sides Musicians: Lyn Stanley, vocals Otmaro Ruiz, piano Mike Lang, piano Chuck Berghofer, bass Aaron Serfaty, drums John Chiodini, guitar Luis Conte, percussion Selections: Side A: Direct-To-Disc Version 1. Goody Goody 2. Love Letters 3. Bye Bye Blackbird Side B: Tape To Disc Version 1. Goody Goody 2. Love Letters 3. Bye Bye Blackbird
    Myles B. Astor, PhD, Administrator
    Senior Editor, Positive-Feedback.com
    ________________________________________

    -Magico S5 Mk.2 speakers with SPod feet
    -cj 40th Anniversary ART300 monoblock amplifiers
    -Merrill Audio Elemente 116 monoblock amplifiers
    -cj GAT preamplifier Series 2 preamplifier
    -Doshi V3.0 phonostage
    -VPI Vanquish direct-drive turntable
    -VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy dual pivot tonearm, VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy gimballed and SAT LM-12 arm
    -Lyra Atlas SL, Fuuga, vdh Colibri Master Signature, MOFI Master Tracker, Sumiko Songbird cartridges
    -Technics RS1506 with Flux Magnetic heads, Doshi V3.0 tape stage (balanced)
    -Assorted cables including Transparent XL Gen. 5, Allnic cables, Skogrand, Viero, Kubala-Sosna, MG Audio, Audience Au24SX, Genesis Advanced Technologies Power Cords
    -Accessories including Stillpoint Aperture panels, Cathedral Sound panels, Furutech NCF Nano AC receptacles; Silver Circle Tchaik 6 PLC, Symposium ISIS and SRA Craz racks, Audiodharma Cable Cooker, Symposium Ultra and assorted SRA platforms.

  • #2
    Interesting to say the least....


    imo: LS is the Jazz version of Vanessa Fernandez,do they actually write or use their own material?


    do Audiophiles buy LS and VF albums. because of the “Quality” of the recording or their singing talent?

    Comment


    • Letsmakeadeal
      Letsmakeadeal commented
      Editing a comment
      If I don't care for the music, I won't purchase regardless of how great the recording might be. Not that it matters but I don't personally care for LS, VF, or AB

  • #3
    Reel-to-Reel Tape vs. Direct-to-Disc?

    This is really
    Direct-to-Disc = microphone --> Lacquer --> one-step plating? --> LP
    Versus
    High Quality Conventional LP = microphone --> R2R Master --> Lacquer --> one-step plating? --> LP
    (both simplified here for comparison.

    It is NOT a R2R vs. D2D direct comparison.

    I have the Anne Bisson Four Seasons in Jazz Live at Bernies in Both D2D AND the direct to Tape both done by Bernie Grundman at the same time through the same mixer. The comparison is a real R2R (with no RIAA, but CCIR) versus D2D (with RIAA) comparison. My tape is a direct copy from the master tape. And the D2D has no tape in the chain. Really apples and oranges.

    Comment


    • Kingrex
      Kingrex commented
      Editing a comment
      How do they differ Joe?

    • Joe Pittman
      Joe Pittman commented
      Editing a comment
      In "my" system, I prefer the Anne Bisson D2D, but my system is optimized for vinyl. I'm just using a stock Studer A810 with it's electronics. If I was using a better tape pre like a Doshi or master tape machine like a Studer A80 or A820, it would be different. The other big issue is the tape is MUCH more expensive, so on a price/performance standpoint, the D2D kicks its ass. In the areas of tapes strength such as consistency from start to finish, pitch perfection and bass, tape is always hard to beat (very dependent on the equipment). I forgot to mention the original master tape was probably 1/2" 30 ips and my copy is 1/4" 15 ips (so there is some loss). Having heard an original lacquer being played, the only fair comparison would be to Bernie's master tape and his equipment at his place... Everything else is just audiophile wanking.

    • Tech7738
      Tech7738 commented
      Editing a comment
      The R2R would certainly not have RIAA on tape. CCIR results in a complimentary response (flat). RIAA is always added pre lacquer in both the R2R and D2D version.

  • #4
    Originally posted by Joe Pittman View Post
    Reel-to-Reel Tape vs. Direct-to-Disc?

    This is really
    Direct-to-Disc = microphone --> Lacquer --> one-step plating? --> LP
    Versus
    High Quality Conventional LP = microphone --> R2R Master --> Lacquer --> one-step plating? --> LP
    (both simplified here for comparison.

    It is NOT a R2R vs. D2D direct comparison.

    .
    EXACTLY. I heard Lyn herself go on about this at Axpona. The only interesting comparison for anyone into tape would be something like the Anne Bison that Joe mentions:

    > microphone --> Lacquer --> one-step plating? --> Direct to Disc LP

    > microphone --> R2R Master --> R2R commercial “direct copy”

    I do not have such a thing of the same exact title. I have lots of tape where I also have standard commercial vinyl, and in that case the tape wins 99.9% of the time.

    For people who do not play tape - what is even the point of this “comparison” LP? That direct to disc sounds better that standard LP? I’d say that’s a given...



    TAPE: Studer A807, A810; Revox B77 MkII; Tascam BR-20; Technics RS-1700; Pioneer RT-707, RT-909
    VINYL: Pioneer PL-50LII/Benz LP-S MR/ModWright PH 9.0; Denon DP59-L/Dynavector 20xH
    DIGITAL: Bryston SP-3, MacMini > Oppo Sonica/Pioneer N-50
    SPEAKERS: B&W Nautilus 800, Pioneer DSS-9
    AMPS: Cary SLP-05/Sunfire Signature 600, Pioneer SX-1980

    Comment


    • Joe Pittman
      Joe Pittman commented
      Editing a comment
      It's important to note that the Anne Bisson D2D was produced with conventional 3-step platting (lacquer --> Father --> Mother --> Stamper, 3000 max pressings and approx max 500 pressings per stamper) albeit with very high quality. The limited 300 unit pressing of Lyn Stanley suggests 1-step plating. But don't see that clarified in the announcement. Typical...

  • #5
    Wow, and we wonder why we can't pass the torch to the younger generation-talk about self indulgent opportunism. Yeah, and I have all the LS,AB & VF albums and I kick myself for buying them all. I have both formats as well.

    Ymmv and all that.
    Front end: Aesthetix Io Eclipse with 2 Power Supplies and Volume controls
    Brinkmann La Grange & RonT Tube Power supply with Kuzma 4-point ,FR64S, Brinkmann 12.1 , .Koetsu Jade Platinum,Koetsu Rosewood Signature Platinum, Lyra Atlas, Lyra Etna SL Goldfinger Statement, KLAUDIO RCM, HRSM3X
    Amps: Wyetech Topaz, Futterman H3 Quad II,Citation II, Marantz 8b, 5 ,2
    Pre-Amps:Marantz 7, Marantz Model 1 Consolette Pair
    Speakers: Quad ESL 57, Beveridge Model 3 DD amps, REL S/2 x 2
    Otari 5050BXII, DeHavilland 222

    Comment


    • #6
      If anyone cares to visit, I have the original of Four Seasons in Jazz - so we can play:

      > microphone --> lacquer

      > microphone --> lacquer --> one-step plating --> test pressing

      > microphone --> lacquer --> convert --> mother --> stamper --> test pressing (of FOUR different vinyl formulations)

      > microphone --> RTR master --> safety copy

      and also

      > microphone --> high-rez digital

      Comment


      • Joe Pittman
        Joe Pittman commented
        Editing a comment
        Tech7738, Gary made the recording at Bernie Grundman's. All of the recordings were done simultaneously and fed from the mixer. So all of the microphones and cables were the same. The provenance is well documented in the D2D pressing liner notes. Don't know if that is available on-line. Gary can comment.

      • garylkoh
        garylkoh commented
        Editing a comment
        I did document the provenance in the story I wrote here (with pictures!)

      • garylkoh
        garylkoh commented
        Editing a comment
        Tech7738 - you are correct that the "-->" in the step between the microphone and the lacquer/RTR/high-res is the most complex step and the most important to SQ. That is why we inserted Michael C. Ross and Bernie Grundman in that step. The recording was made in the Bernie Grundman Studio, and Michael was given free hand on whatever gear he wanted to use (including the best microphones). The recordings were made direct-to-disc (lacquer) and direct-to-2track (RTR) and direct-to-digital simultaneously using Bernie Grundman's all-analog console.
    Working...
    X