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Pentangle (first album) plus, Fred Neil- S/T

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  • fcrowder
    commented on 's reply
    My experience mirrors yours with respect to the superiority of the Transatlantic pressings. With respect to Renbourn, I particularly like "Sailing to America".

  • Bill Hart
    replied
    Originally posted by Asamel View Post
    Pentangle and Fairport Convention never let me down. They stand with bands like the Byrds as desert island discs. The Weavers not so much. Very different animals.
    That trilogy of Fairport albums recorded in just a year's time, from "What We Did on our Holiday" to "Unhalfbricking" to "Liege and Lief" never fails to satisfy. Though they progressively got more celtic, and pushed away from the American folk influences, I still find "What We Did..." captivating. The early orange bulls-eye copies are now quite dear-- I have both pink label and pink rim copies of "Unhalfbricking" that deserve a re-listen once I get set up again; and of course, L &L is just an outstanding album, though one that took several copies to find in truly dead quiet condition. The mix of Richard Thompson and Sandy Denny's voice is pretty much a once in a lifetime thing. She passed away young, and of course, he's still out there. One of the several great acts produced by Joe Boyd.

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  • Asamel
    replied
    Pentangle and Fairport Convention never let me down. They stand with bands like the Byrds as desert island discs. The Weavers not so much. Very different animals.

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  • user510
    replied

    I do like Pentangle quite a lot. A few years back I was collecting a complete set. When possible I would get the UK Transatlantic pressings. Perhaps my favorite album is "Basket of Light".

    English Folk with a helping of Apalachian traditional and then a serving of psychedelia tossed into the mix.
    I also picked up a copy of Renbourne's "Sir John a Lot". One side of that one is definitely medieval in structure, the other side is something else. I'll have to play it again to jog my memory.

    Generally, the Reprise pressings don't seem to have the clarity of the Transatlantics, but I'll take my Pentangle anyway I can get it.

    -Steve

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  • rbbert
    commented on 's reply
    Personally I like all the Pentangle albums, there are many different editions on CD with varying bonus tracks (and varying sound quality). Not nearly so much on LP for those who prefer that. Also lots of Bert Jansch and John Renbourn solo stuff (both RIP)

  • rbbert
    commented on 's reply
    I seem to recall "Sir John A Lot..." on many "super disc" lists back in vinyl's heyday

  • Rob
    commented on 's reply
    you'll want the transatlantic pressing like this one
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/The-Pentangl...gAAOSweW5VckXE

  • fcrowder
    replied
    For those who like Pentangle, I would highly recommend any of the early recordings by John Renbourn, many of which are sonically spectacular.

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  • rbbert
    replied
    White background, black "pentangle"

    Click image for larger version

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  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Hart View Post
    I think this was considered a hi-fi spectacular back in the day, but I got what appears to be a very early US pressing, in the era when Reprise had a two tone label and the word "STEREO" is printed in bold at 6 o'clock on the label. The cover has the W7 logo, as does the record. Anyway, this thing is amazing, musically and sonically. it's not a terribly expensive record, the UK pressings are more collectible (but trying to find a clean one at a reasonable price is always the challenge, isn't it, aside from shipping costs). So, this is one you might like, if you are willing to dig a little hip folk.
    The Fred Neil album is another killer folk record, his deep voice (he is probably most famous for the song, Everybody's Talkin' which Nilsson covered and for which he scored a Grammy--it was made popular by its inclusion in Midnight Cowboy). The self-titled record is on Capitol, mono copies aren't expensive, stereo copies are apparently far more scarce. I haven't listened to the reissues. Another winner. File under Folk-psych.
    What is the first Pentagle album cover look like? I looked at Discogs and there's two albums listed for 1968.

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  • rbbert
    replied
    I've always considered Pentangle psychedelic-folk. Coincidentally I was just watching their 5-30-68 performance from Norwegian TV on Tuesday. Pretty nice stuff.

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  • Rob
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Hart View Post
    I think this was considered a hi-fi spectacular back in the day, but I got what appears to be a very early US pressing, in the era when Reprise had a two tone label and the word "STEREO" is printed in bold at 6 o'clock on the label. The cover has the W7 logo, as does the record. Anyway, this thing is amazing, musically and sonically. it's not a terribly expensive record, the UK pressings are more collectible (but trying to find a clean one at a reasonable price is always the challenge, isn't it, aside from shipping costs). So, this is one you might like, if you are willing to dig a little hip folk.
    I have a UK first press I acquired a few years back, its a solid NM copy and set me back about fifty bucks. Mikey has used this record as a reference since his earliest days at TAS, he's waxed on and on about it for so long I finally broke down and got me one. the sonics are very good-excellent and a no-brainer if you're into British folk-rock of that era.

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  • mep
    replied
    I was thinking last night as the Weavers were playing that "If I Had a Hammer" handy, I would have smashed that LP.

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  • Bill Hart
    replied
    Originally posted by mep View Post
    I'm burned out on folk music. I bought the Weavers at CH reissue from Chad as HP used to yammer about this LP. I know the Hokey Pokey is a dance, but this is Hokey Fokey music to me. I played Side 2 last night and I started laughing that I bought this LP.
    I hear you, but this isn't "Puff the Magic Dragon." I mentioned earlier, in another post, Davey Graham, who I only learned about b/c some of his work was cited as prior art in the Zep/Spirit case for the descending chord progression. I've started buying more of his records, he was virtually unknown here. The folks in The Pentangle included at the time Bert Jansch (legendary guitarist who himself was a model for many who followed in his style of intricate chords and picked lines), John Renborn (a master of baroque style) and Danny Thompson, who played double bass with almost everybody, but whose work on John Martyn's Solid Air is just outstanding. These guys drew from all kinds of influences, so it's not just wienies around a campfire singing Kumbaya. You might actually like it. In fact, if you buy a clean copy of the old Reprise pressing I described and don't like it, I'll buy it from you and include shipping. Some of this stuff is the same type of music that influenced people like Page, Ian Anderson and others. But, don't let me persuade you.

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  • mep
    replied
    I'm burned out on folk music. I bought the Weavers at CH reissue from Chad as HP used to yammer about this LP. I know the Hokey Pokey is a dance, but this is Hokey Fokey music to me. I played Side 2 last night and I started laughing that I bought this LP.

    Leave a comment:

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