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  • #16
    Click image for larger version  Name:	 Views:	1 Size:	88.3 KB ID:	57304

    Over time dust will still get in via the handle holes. Nevertheless a huge benefit. Every table needs a cover.
    Steve

    Studer Enthusiast

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    • MylesBAstor
      MylesBAstor commented
      Editing a comment
      Especially if are a pet owner and have tubes.

  • #17
    Hate to burst anyone's bubble, but if you use your table regularly, its a major pain in the ass removing and replacing the dust cover after every session. I rarely use mine anymore, only for when I know I'm not going to listen in a few days or so. It also takes up a lot of space when not on the table. Almost wish I didn't buy it.
    Magnepan 1.6 QR Loudspeakers, Amherst A-2000 MOSFET 150 WPC Amp, Conrad Johnson PV-10A Modded Tube Line & Phono Stage, Electrocompaniet MC II Class A Head Amp, Audio Technica AT-OC9XML Cart (Stereo) , Graham Engineering 2.2 Tonearm (Stereo) , VPI Aries-1 Turntable (Stereo) , VPI Clamp, Denon DL-102 Cart, (Mono) , Luxman Tonearm (Mono) , Kenwood KD-500 Turntable (Mpmp) , Michell Clamp, Marantz 20B Analog FM Tuner, Pioneer SACD, Onkyo DX-6800 CD Transport, DIY 24B/192K DAC, Sennheiser HD-650 Headphones, Headroom Max Balanced Headphone Amp, DIY Silver Interconnects

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    • #18
      LMAO!!! Yes it's a real pain in the ass, it takes me all of two seconds to remove or replace mine.
      Attached Files

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      • #19
        I use the GEM (George E. Merrill) Dandy polycover on my VPI HR-X. It keeps dust off the platter and I use an artist's paint brush to brush dust off the plinth from time to time. Cheap and effective.

        Comment


        • JCOConnell
          JCOConnell commented
          Editing a comment
          a poor mans solution would be to just use a junk record as a cover,

      • #20
        I never thought about a cover for my Kuzma XL/Airline, simply because it would be humongous. I stick a dead record on the platter to keep it clean. What's interesting is, I find more lint/detritus appearing on the platter over time- as a result of listening sessions and the vortex action of the spinning- than dust build up on the arm/bearing tube; you'd think the latter would be tres sensitive to dust. I clean the bearing tube say, once every 3-6 months with some isopropyl and a microfibre cloth and use one of those lint "sticky rollers" to clean the platter mat, which seems more effective than a brush.
        Not saying not to buy a dust cover--some of those look very nice.
        MylesBAstor I'm also wondering about the attraction of dust that Myles mentioned. In my experience, using a strong handheld light in a darkened room, you can find dust, lint particles nearly everywhere. Vacuuming helps, as does a damp rag. Far better than those "dusters" which really just push it off one surface temporarily. Humidity reduces static, and hence a charge that might be a dust magnet. I don't know if there is a way to "ground" the table to minimize that charge. Not sure a bench top ionizer will do much beyond it's surface area--have no idea whether they still make large ionizers; i know there are some HEPA (or higher grade) portable air filtration systems that are used in non-audio applications that recycle the air in a room. When I asked our HVAC service people about HEPA filters for our central air, they said they were too restrictive, and put an additional load on the system, making it less efficient. I haven't yet had a chance to explore whatever the modern equivalent is of central electrostatic filtering. We had those in houses way back when and I think they worked. Today, it was 103F in Austin. Needless to say, no windows are opened and apart from contractors (after whom I clean immediately), we haven't had a lot of traffic (yet). But the dust still appears.

        Comment


        • #21
          I have a Stereo Squares dust cover on my VPI Prime and it is great. I purchased the two piece cover that hinges up and you prop it open with a support:



          It has been great. As you can see, I took some extra care to avoid any acoustical or mechanical feedback. The gasket that the cover sits on are strips of thick sorbothane. One thing that may not be obvious is that there is sorbothane sheeting on the back side of the bottom half of the dust cover.

          All of this resulted in a dust cover that has no effect on the sound. I have used the table at concert level sound with the dust cover propped open as shown and no feedback at all.

          It is an excellent product.

          Ed
          Life is analog...digital is just samples thereof
          https://www.edsstuff.org

          Analog: Walnut VPI Prime TT, HRX Pulley + 3 Belt Drive + ADS, Dual Pivot Assy, Tru Lift, HW-40 Feet
          Analog 2: Ortofon Windfeld Ti + Bob's Devices VPI Sky 30 Stepup + Liberty Audio B2B-1, Stereo Squares Dust Cover, Wayne's Audio Peripheral Ring
          Analog Care: VPI MW-1, Kirmuss KA-RC-1, Record Doctor V, Hunt EDA VI Brush, AQ Brush, Discwasher Record Care Kit
          Digital: TASCAM UH-7000 USB Interface, Pioneer Elite DV-47Ai Universal Disc Player, NAD C448 Internet Radio/Streamer
          Digital 2: Digital Audio Workstation (Toshiba P75-A7200 w/MS Windows 10, 24GB RAM, 1.5 TB Crucial MX300 SSD Internal Storage, Intel i7-4700MQ Processor)

          Amp: Rogue RP-9 Line Preamp, Schiit Loki Tone Ctrls, Parasound A21 Power Amp
          Speakers: Magnepan MMC2, REL T9/i Subwoofer
          Headphones: Stax SR L700 MkII + Woo Audio GES, Focal Clear + Schiit Lyr 2, Stax Lambda Pro + SRM1 Mk II
          Wires: Kimber Hero ICs, Kimber 8TC Speaker Cables, AQ Leopard Phono IC, Pangea Silver USB Cables, StraightWire Expressivo ICs
          Power: Furman Elite 15 PFi

          Comment


          • #22
            Besides Audio, I am involved in another life long hobby. I had some acrylic dust covers made for some of the devices I use. The company that made the dust covers, stated that they do NOT use glue or adhesive to construct the pieces of acrylic covers since they promote corrosion of metal parts. Instead of using primitive glue, they use high accuracy dovetail joints. The pins and tails fit to perfection and look quite attractive.
            Click image for larger version

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            • JCOConnell
              JCOConnell commented
              Editing a comment
              ok, I give up, whats in the case?

          • #23
            Originally posted by Bill Hart View Post
            I never thought about a cover for my Kuzma XL/Airline, simply because it would be humongous. I stick a dead record on the platter to keep it clean. What's interesting is, I find more lint/detritus appearing on the platter over time- as a result of listening sessions and the vortex action of the spinning- than dust build up on the arm/bearing tube; you'd think the latter would be tres sensitive to dust. I clean the bearing tube say, once every 3-6 months with some isopropyl and a microfibre cloth and use one of those lint "sticky rollers" to clean the platter mat, which seems more effective than a brush.
            Not saying not to buy a dust cover--some of those look very nice.
            MylesBAstor I'm also wondering about the attraction of dust that Myles mentioned. In my experience, using a strong handheld light in a darkened room, you can find dust, lint particles nearly everywhere. Vacuuming helps, as does a damp rag. Far better than those "dusters" which really just push it off one surface temporarily. Humidity reduces static, and hence a charge that might be a dust magnet. I don't know if there is a way to "ground" the table to minimize that charge. Not sure a bench top ionizer will do much beyond it's surface area--have no idea whether they still make large ionizers; i know there are some HEPA (or higher grade) portable air filtration systems that are used in non-audio applications that recycle the air in a room. When I asked our HVAC service people about HEPA filters for our central air, they said they were too restrictive, and put an additional load on the system, making it less efficient. I haven't yet had a chance to explore whatever the modern equivalent is of central electrostatic filtering. We had those in houses way back when and I think they worked. Today, it was 103F in Austin. Needless to say, no windows are opened and apart from contractors (after whom I clean immediately), we haven't had a lot of traffic (yet). But the dust still appears.
            Yes to the record attracting dust while in play.

            Article by Myles B. Astor
            http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue38/lp_sleaves.htm
            Wilson also demonstrated that a spinning record creates a vortex that sucks dirt out of the air down onto the record. He also demonstrated that this aerodynamic action causes the extent of contamination to vary across the album and "‘pops and crackles' arise in a record mostly at the outside grooves and then at the middle of the recorded surface.' As Wilson states in his article, "between the two there is commonly a quiet patch, as there is also nearer to the label."
            Interesting about the dovetail no glue cover. I need to fix a small crack in my cover, should I worry about the solvent?

            My cover was so dirty that I had to wash it with water, but then had water spots. So I rinsed it with distilled water and I swear it cut down the static. I suspect that a clean cover attracts less dust and is lower in static.

            I use a household ionizer that claims to clean the air next to my TT. It also cleans up the background on music in my opinion.

            If you use a brush to get dust off your record try the method advocated by Sleeve City with their Thunderon brush. I used the same method with my Hunt carbon fiber and felt brush and it worked!

            Do not wipe while on TT platter, hold record in one hand like a waiter and wipe record with brush with other hand.

            Do the side you intend to play, and repeat for the B side just before playing.

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