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TIMA'S DIY ULTRASONIC RCM

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  • TIMA'S DIY ULTRASONIC RCM

    Our friend Tima is not only a thoughtful, inquisitive author of audio matters, but took the time to assemble a DIY Ultrasonic RCM after some research and experimentation.
    Tima was gracious enough to allow me to publish the piece at TheVinylPress. It is an informative, enjoyable read:

    Click image for larger version

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    http://thevinylpress.com/timas-diy-rcm/

  • #2
    Bill is too modest to mention - say, that phrase reminds me of Lene Lovich's Too Tender to Touch - sorry... Bill is too modest to mention his own article noted as a Sidebar on DIY Ultrasonic LP Cleaning, but it is really a very nice standalone commentary that you should read.

    Comment


    • don
      don commented
      Editing a comment
      Tima do the vacuum tubes at the back get a wash, how do they sound afterwards LOL

    • tima
      tima commented
      Editing a comment
      Nah, they stay high and dry. Those are NOS 6H30-DRs, some with Herbies dampers on 'em.

  • #3
    If you're interested what may be the top-of-the-line USC as mentioned in our coverage (above), the German Elma Ultrasonic P120H that works with (and is recommended by) Franc Kuzma's RD record cleaning rotisserie, I see it is now on sale - which I've not seen happen until now.

    was $3,139.00
    now $2,762.00

    Thus far this is the only unit I've seen in the requisite size that offers dual frequency, 37 kHz and 80 kHz.

    This USC business started for me as an experiment so I didn't go whole hog. My $350 USC bought direct from Beijing Ultrasonic works only at 40 kHz. Thus far its running nominally at 2+ months of operation. That's probably the only thing holding me back from the Elma unit. Maybe Bill will get one and tell us about it. :-)
    Last edited by tima; 01-10-2019, 06:02 AM. Reason: correct my error on Beijing USC frequency from 80 to 40kHz

    Comment


    • #4
      Bravo on going DIY, I do it whenever possible (time permitting). You really understand the 'problem' so much better and solutions will come to you out of thin air (day dreaming, sitting at a stop light, etc). I learned more about this mad hobby of ours (record cleaning in this case) when I rolled up my sleeves rather than going to a turnkey solution and expecting miracles out of something like the KL or AD RCMs.
      Linn Kilmax LP12 | Channel D | Pass Labs | First Watt | Chord | Innuos | Klipsch Cornwall IV

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Rob View Post
        Bravo on going DIY, I do it whenever possible (time permitting). You really understand the 'problem' so much better and solutions will come to you out of thin air (day dreaming, sitting at a stop light, etc). I learned more about this mad hobby of ours (record cleaning in this case) when I rolled up my sleeves rather than going to a turnkey solution and expecting miracles out of something like the KL or AD RCMs.
        So YOU'RE the guy that just sits there after the light turns green!
        SP-10 MKII table with custom power supply designed and built by Peter Noerbaek with an SME 3012R with Dyna XV-1S cartridge, VPI Avenger table with rim drive and JMW -12-3D arrm with Lyra Etna SL cartridge, ARC Ref 3 phono stage, Otari MX-55 tape deck, Ampex 350 repros, Roon Nucleus Plus server, PS Audio DSJ DAC, ARC Ref 6 pre, ARC Ref 75 amp, JBL 4345 speakers with a pair of Def Tech Ref subs.

        Comment


        • Rob
          Rob commented
          Editing a comment
          apparently I was also a horrible listener, constantly in my "own world" according to the ex. its not easy being a renaissance man

        • Bill Hart
          Bill Hart commented
          Editing a comment
          This is a function of wife-itis. My wife says exactly the same thing about me.
          The question is-- who changed? Or is it just wear and tear after a lot of miles?
          Don't answer that.

      • #6
        Vbr,

        Sam

        Comment


        • #7
          Here is a follow-up on adventures with my DIY ultrasonic record cleaning setup posted on Bill Hart's delightful Web site: The Vinyl Press.

          This follow-up takes a look at the operation of the filtering system at the point where I changed the water in the USC tank.

          Click image for larger version

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          Doing the refill, I decided to increase the amount of IPA and surfactant/wetting agent (Ilfotol) and will try to report on what happened with that the next time the water is changed.

          Thanks Bill!

          Comment


          • #8
            Originally posted by tima View Post
            Here is a follow-up on adventures with my DIY ultrasonic record cleaning setup posted on Bill Hart's delightful Web site: The Vinyl Press.

            This follow-up takes a look at the operation of the filtering system at the point where I changed the water in the USC tank.

            Click image for larger version

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ID:	72075

            Doing the refill, I decided to increase the amount of IPA and surfactant/wetting agent (Ilfotol) and will try to report on what happened with that the next time the water is changed.

            Thanks Bill!
            You've convinced me, simply by photo demonstration and explanation how vital filtering the water is---

            Comment


            • #9
              After reading the entire RCM Diy Audio thread and then seeing TIMA's homebrew, I was so envious, I decided I needed my own (cheap) filtering system for my KL Audio machine. Built this for about $75 (you can google all my references below in Amazon to order parts).

              I routed the KL's 3/8" ID output drain tube to an Attwood Potable Water pump (12V DC requiring a Sunforce AC/DC converter), then to a Pentek 158110 3/8" #5 Slim Line Clear Filter Housing w/ an SDC-25-0501 1 micron polypropylene filter 2.5"x5" Hydronix Filter. From there, I ran some more 3/8" ID 1/2" OD vinyl tubing (Proper Pour 10ft) tube back to the inlet of the KL Audio machine. You'll need 2 Banjo HB038 Polypropylene Hose Fittings, Adapter, 3/8" NPT Male x 3/8" Barbed for the filter housing and some stainless steel adjustable 10-16mm hose clamps to connect everything and prevent leaks. Oh, you can't run the filter when the records are being cleaned because they block the inlet hole where you add water to the KL Audio, but that's obviously not a problem. You might want to add an on/off switch or just unplug the pump like I do. You have to cut the connection to the AC/DC converter to wire it to the pump, but it's easy.

              I also bought an in-line fish tank heater to heat the water ($60), but I'm not going to use it. When I measured the water temp in the KL Audio machine after running it 15 minutes, it was about 100 degrees F. Apparently fish don't like hot baths like we do and the in-line heater automatically shuts off at 36C (96.8F) so it's of little use. I guess I'll just have to buy some fish and a tank and start a new hobby. Can't wait to start upgrading my fish already!!!

              Hope this is helpful.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Barry View Post
                After reading the entire RCM Diy Audio thread and then seeing TIMA's homebrew, I was so envious, I decided I needed my own (cheap) filtering system for my KL Audio machine. Built this for about $75 (you can google all my references below in Amazon to order parts).

                I routed the KL's 3/8" ID output drain tube to an Attwood Potable Water pump (12V DC requiring a Sunforce AC/DC converter), then to a Pentek 158110 3/8" #5 Slim Line Clear Filter Housing w/ an SDC-25-0501 1 micron polypropylene filter 2.5"x5" Hydronix Filter. From there, I ran some more 3/8" ID 1/2" OD vinyl tubing (Proper Pour 10ft) tube back to the inlet of the KL Audio machine. You'll need 2 Banjo HB038 Polypropylene Hose Fittings, Adapter, 3/8" NPT Male x 3/8" Barbed for the filter housing and some stainless steel adjustable 10-16mm hose clamps to connect everything and prevent leaks. Oh, you can't run the filter when the records are being cleaned because they block the inlet hole where you add water to the KL Audio, but that's obviously not a problem. You might want to add an on/off switch or just unplug the pump like I do. You have to cut the connection to the AC/DC converter to wire it to the pump, but it's easy.

                I also bought an in-line fish tank heater to heat the water ($60), but I'm not going to use it. When I measured the water temp in the KL Audio machine after running it 15 minutes, it was about 100 degrees F. Apparently fish don't like hot baths like we do and the in-line heater automatically shuts off at 36C (96.8F) so it's of little use. I guess I'll just have to buy some fish and a tank and start a new hobby. Can't wait to start upgrading my fish already!!!

                Hope this is helpful.
                I assume you are referring to the KL that is designed for an outboard tank, and not the original model(s)?
                You deserve a reward just for reading that entire DIY thread. It's like reading the Encyclopedia Brittanica. Thanks for your input on this. I still have a KL, the one made after they added the additional cooling and changed the operating controls~ what, about 3 or 4 years now?

                Comment


                • Barry
                  Barry commented
                  Editing a comment
                  My KL Audio was purchased `in March of 2014, and is the original design? - KD-CLN-LP200, and has an internal reservoir. It is not designed for an external tank, and the filler hole is integral to the record slot. It has a switch on the side for wash & dry and dry only, and looks otherwise similar to the current internal tank model.

                  I spent 3+ hours reading the DIY thread copying all the parts alternatives up to post #160 or so. Everything I've listed works perfectly (except for the dumb fish tank heater which was my goofy idea), is available from Amazon, and it's cheap compared to KL's external plumbing. It took me a lot longer to read about it than assemble it.

                  I would be a hell of a lot smarter if I had read the Encyclopedia Britannica instead of reading audio magazines these last 45 years. What a waste. Hey, maybe it's not too late...

                • Bill Hart
                  Bill Hart commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks for the reply, Barry. So, the water outlet is easy; for the input back to the KL, you are feeding thru the filler hole on the top?
                  I may adopt your filter method for the time being. I am currently changing out the water approx every 30 records, and all used records (and some new ones) are pre-cleaned before the go into the KL. But a filter would be nice. Good stuff that you posted. Thank you!

                • Barry
                  Barry commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes Bill. The pump feeds the filter canister with its output tubing running back up to the KL's filler hole on the top of the unit. The KL is on a table above the pump and filter shown in the picture. This helps flow rate by providing gravity feed of the drain water into the pump.

                  I filled the entire add-on system with distilled water/solution after the KL Audio was filled to the proper level. To operate, stick the return tube into the filler hole, open the KL drain valve, and start the pump. The flow rate with this pump is quite fast, yet when you turn off the pump, it takes maybe 20 seconds or so for the KL Audio reservoir to fill back to the start level. I put a paper clamp on the end of the return tube when the pump system is not in use so I don't lose any water.

              • #11
                Nice job Barry! Sounds like you evaluated your particular situation and came up with a quite workable approach for adding a filter.

                I'm wholly convinced of the necessity to filter the USC water or change it very frequently.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Here's a pic of the KL Audio showing the existing drain tube (that's connected to the pump on the floor) and the return tube (that's routed from the filter cannister) inserted into the KL's filler hole.

                  Comment


                  • tima
                    tima commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I'm curious about the motor choice. It looks fine and obviously does the trick. Could you not find one to your liking that was 120V ?

                  • Barry
                    Barry commented
                    Editing a comment
                    There are several dozens of 120V pumps that are submersibles. Also ones that are higher flow rate models, or are more expensive (my total cost $45 including converter). I was also looking for ones with existing fittings for 3/8" ID tubing and didn't want to build a case for it. I wanted to get everything from Amazon so I could keep track of ordering. Someone recommended this on DiyAudio.

                • #13
                  Bill, tima, or others - have you tried or used an anti static in the primary stage before initial tanking? Some of my new product purchases are charged like capacitors in their paper sleeves. I usually wet clean on a VPI before going into the Elma tank to attempt to keep the tank water as clean as possible.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Originally posted by Spla'nin View Post
                    Bill, tima, or others - have you tried or used an anti static in the primary stage before initial tanking? Some of my new product purchases are charged like capacitors in their paper sleeves. I usually wet clean on a VPI before going into the Elma tank to attempt to keep the tank water as clean as possible.
                    Tima is doing pure ultrasonic at this point, straight in. So his approach may be different than mine.
                    I'm almost always cleaning a record first on the Monks- that process eliminates any static due to the nature of wet cleaning.
                    For the small handful of brand new records that I put straight in to the KL ultrasonic, many have a static charge coming out of the paper sleeve. The wet bath/ultrasonic process kills the charge. Is your VPI pre-clean leaving a charge? If so, vacuum a little less- are you doing a rinse step before the ultrasonic? Let the record remain slightly damp if so. But, even if the record remained charged coming off the VPI, wouldn't the charge be dissipated by the ultrasonic process that follows?

                    Comment


                    • Spla'nin
                      Spla'nin commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I get curious and want to preview the vinyl sometimes before immersion into the complete cleaning process. It only happens on occasion so probably a perfect storm of cellophane, cardboard paper & vinyl recipes for static storage. Am considering a Zerostat or better (?) for when impatience takes over. Just curious if you had a temp. work around.

                    • Bill Hart
                      Bill Hart commented
                      Editing a comment
                      So, you are playing a record, new or used, without cleaning? That's not safe sex.*
                      The Zerostat works, it is over-priced and i personally find it to be a pain in the ass to operate.
                      If you regularly do this, you might consider buying a used industrial bench ionizer-- it's basically the commercial grade version of the Furutech D-Stat or whatever. Under $100 used on E-Bay if you can find one that hasn't been bashed and trashed.
                      ___________
                      *My concern is that if there are any particulates, you are going to grind them into the grooves if you play an uncleaned record. Granted, people played LPs for many years before the advent of vacuum cleaning or ultrasonic, but don't you think there's a reason why so many used LPs of the common variety are noisy and cleaning them after the fact doesn't completely eliminate the noise? Not the sole reason for groove grunge, ticks and pops, but one of them.

                  • #15
                    First let me apologize for asking a question that has already been addressed. Would someone suggest an appropriate anti microbial agent for use in an ultrasonic record cleaning machine?
                    Rockport Sirius turntable, Lyra Atlas SL cartridge, Audio Note M9 SE Phono stage, Audio Note M10 (Signature) linestage, EMM Labs TX2/DA2 digital, Audio Note Balanced Kegon amps, EMM Labs MTRX amps, Acapella Triolons, Jorma Prime and Odin 2 cables, Stage 3 Kraken power cords, HB Marble Powerslave, Finite Elemente Pagode Reference stands and Cerabases, Halcyonics active isolation bases, HRS Equipment stand, Stillpoints Ultra 6 footers, Furitech cable isolators and plugs, Loricraft and Audiodesk vinyl cleaners, Yamaha CT7000 Tuner.

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