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A pair of Studer A 820 one year later

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  • Mike Lavigne
    replied
    Originally posted by dminches View Post

    Mike, if you haven’t already you should listen to the Doshi tape pre in your system and see if you still feel the same way. Nick’s pre is by far the best out there and brings tape to a different level.
    my King Cello is going into Charles King in September for an upgrade to add meters and pots to more finely adjust it. it has an interface advantage over other tape repro's in my system since it has the 50 ohm BNC 'zeel' outputs that allow my 11 meter cables to sound great to my dart pre on the other side of the room.

    once that is done i might get the Doshi from Ki Choi to try and see how it compares. but it will have to deal with a long balanced cable.

    Leave a comment:


  • dminches
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Lavigne View Post

    i have to disagree. i think vinyl as a format has so many areas where it's not optimized.....that we think we know the ceiling....then that ceiling gets blown away. i think that if i compare vinyl <-> 1/4" tape from 12 years ago (when my Studer A-820 and Ampex ATR-102 first arrived) in my system compared to vinyl <-> 1/4" tape now it is a far different picture. the 1/4" tape now must be primo-primo to rise above a good pressing. and my best 45 rpm pressings are a force of nature....eye to eye with very fine tapes.

    active isolation for the whole signal path plus my new Durand Tosca tonearm have changed the space time continuum on this issue. kinda scary really. and i'm as all-in with RTR as anyone.

    just my 2 cents of course.
    Mike, if you haven’t already you should listen to the Doshi tape pre in your system and see if you still feel the same way. Nick’s pre is by far the best out there and brings tape to a different level.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Lavigne
    replied
    Originally posted by MylesBAstor View Post

    Yet with all things being equal even 1/4 inch tape always wins because it sounds the same from start to finish, has better dynamics and frequency extremes and the bass isn’t mono’d. Most of all just has more information. Sure there’s lots of lousy tape transfers out there.

    What is interesting is that hat LPs can give the “impression” of having more body and standing out in bold relief. But that’s because they lack the same sense of ambience and sense space of tape.
    i have to disagree. i think vinyl as a format has so many areas where it's not optimized.....that we think we know the ceiling....then that ceiling gets blown away. i think that if i compare vinyl <-> 1/4" tape from 12 years ago (when my Studer A-820 and Ampex ATR-102 first arrived) in my system compared to vinyl <-> 1/4" tape now it is a far different picture. the 1/4" tape now must be primo-primo to rise above a good pressing. and my best 45 rpm pressings are a force of nature....eye to eye with very fine tapes.

    active isolation for the whole signal path plus my new Durand Tosca tonearm have changed the space time continuum on this issue. kinda scary really. and i'm as all-in with RTR as anyone.

    just my 2 cents of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Lavigne View Post

    that's about how i would explain the A-820 <-> vinyl difference too. although i'd say any decent 1/2" tape transfer does typically surpass even the best vinyl. 15ips 1/2" is just a breed apart. 15ips 1/4" compared to the vinyl is as Dre explains.
    Yet with all things being equal even 1/4 inch tape always wins because it sounds the same from start to finish, has better dynamics and frequency extremes and the bass isn’t mono’d. Most of all just has more information. Sure there’s lots of lousy tape transfers out there.

    What is interesting is that hat LPs can give the “impression” of having more body and standing out in bold relief. But that’s because they lack the same sense of ambience and sense space of tape.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    commented on 's reply
    JC there’s still limitations with the lathe and recording process.

  • topoxforddoc
    replied
    Add Dolby SR into the equation and you get 105 dB S/N dynamic range on CCIR (according to the Dolby 363 SR/A manual)

    Leave a comment:


  • Avare
    replied
    Originally posted by JCOConnell View Post
    Wouldn't a well cut , engineered, and pressed d2d Lp have a better S/N ratio than a tape made from same session?
    When? The latest tapes have 9 dB less noise than the tapes that were standard when Dollby A became popular. That is roughly spanning 20 years (mid 60s to 80s) to 499 etc.

    Overlooked is that the d2d is third generation at best while the tape retail product could be second generation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tapetech
    commented on 's reply
    At the frequency extremes (like 10KHz and 100Hz), a professional tape deck using SM900 or ATR tape trounces any vinyl rig. I would guess 10dB more dynamic range at those frequencies.

  • Skylab
    commented on 's reply
    Only as a way of simplifying the total chain. And that doesn’t have anything to do with tape as a playback medium having superior S/N ratio over vinyl

  • JCOConnell
    commented on 's reply
    the sole reason d2d disks sound so good is the elimination of the tape deck stage

  • JCOConnell
    commented on 's reply
    then why did they have to strap dolby A processors on professional decks to tame the hiss

  • Skylab
    commented on 's reply
    I don’t think so. I love vinyl, but tape is far superior in s/n ratio, channel separation, and quite a few other “stats”.

  • JCOConnell
    replied
    Wouldn't a well cut , engineered, and pressed d2d Lp have a better S/N ratio than a tape made from same session?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Lavigne
    replied
    Originally posted by Dre_J View Post



    Hi earlinarizona,

    Mark mentioned the thread about multiple decks. It was a thread where I asked a series of questions for tape deck owners to share some thoughts about their multiple 15ips capable tape decks. Those questions included which deck sounds best to their owners.

    So, for how the Studer A 820s compare to my other tape decks, you can see these links:


    Regarding the sound of the A 820s compared to vinyl (Specifically my vinyl playback):
    • It depends on the tape and/or the LP. Additionally, the vinyl playback chain (choice of components) plays a big role in how close vinyl will come to the sound of the tape in terms of dynamics, ease, timbre, coherence, detail, drive, extension at both extremes, etc. For the tape itself, since we are only talking about my Studer A 820 (when properly calibrated), it will depend on the tape province and how well it was transferred.
    • With those coments said, my analog playback on vinyl can match my tape playback on the Studer A 820 in some instances and surpass it in some others (with the right LP and playback combination). In other cases, with other tapes, the Studer A 820 will be ahead.
    • As noted, this is with my vinyl setup that includes 'table, 'arm, 'cartridge, phonostage, and most importantly the actual installation and setup.

    I hope I've answered your questions.

    Dre
    that's about how i would explain the A-820 <-> vinyl difference too. although i'd say any decent 1/2" tape transfer does typically surpass even the best vinyl. 15ips 1/2" is just a breed apart. 15ips 1/4" compared to the vinyl is as Dre explains.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dre_J
    replied
    Originally posted by studer7782 View Post

    Hi
    do you sell them
    respect
    Hello,

    I do not refurbish Studers to sell. These are my personal tape decks.

    Dre

    Leave a comment:

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