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What have you DIY'd in your system?

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  • #31
    I dropped in the neo upgrade version spkrs, OB A15 NEO's from pure audio project .. into my OB project. Will eventually be experimenting with more of their components once I get other priorities out of the way. If you have ever had Zu, Spatial or other spkrs made from pro drivers, they take forever to break in at 'normal' listening levels
    (500hrs at higher than loud levels)
    . I thought these however were an immediate improvement and settled nicely in after 40 hours. Kudos to Pure Audio for their selection of parts design on these.

    http://www.pureaudioproject.com/prod...-bass-woofers/

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    • don
      don commented
      Editing a comment
      What c/o slope are you using

    • Spla'nin
      Spla'nin commented
      Editing a comment
      Still experimenting with several.

  • #32
    A number of DIY projects - probably the most significant was replacing the stock internal x-overs from my Tannoy Canterburys with Duelund bi-wire xovers, and bypassing Tannoy front panel eq circuitry.

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    • don
      don commented
      Editing a comment
      It looks like what Jeff Day experimented with

    • Kingrex
      Kingrex commented
      Editing a comment
      That crossover is the bomb. I wish I could afford Deulund. I am about to pull the trigger on Clarity CMR and Mundorf F Supreme. They will parallel for 44 uf. I currently have 1 x 47 uf Mundorf MKP. Its to veiled. I am also getting the Path Resistors.

  • #33
    Jeff gave me the idea

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    • don
      don commented
      Editing a comment
      Was it cost effective for the sound difference, the Duelunds are quite expensive and I have always wondered if they do any better than a Jupiter wax or Jensen oil

    • Barry
      Barry commented
      Editing a comment
      I also used Duelund caps for speaker crossovers. I have successfully used Jupiter copper foil and wax caps in Pass Labs electronics upgrades and really like them, often more than anything else. I would certainly consider them if I were on a budget. You could use lesser quality caps for the parallel ones. The bigger caps (especially Duelunds) really require extended break-in. I would recommend a cable cooker.

  • #34
    Today I added 2 more OB outboard woofers (GR SW-12-16FR) to my Rythmik sub system in opposite corners so I am testing & calibrating room interface. Really liking the increased def & depth of soundstage.
    Last edited by Spla'nin; 12-15-2017, 12:52 AM.

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    • #35
      I am trying some different neo Faitalpro drivers on some 18" SEOS waveguides, I have been using same brand ferrite on 15" SEOS units.

      I am also thinking of repurposing some of my DIY Tunami Oyaide power cords into grounding cables ie Gutwire style.

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      • #36
        One of the Banes of My Existence is the air compressor for my tone arm. I love the Airline arm, it has worked flawlessly in the 11 years I've been using it, but air compressors (at least the larger ones) are notoriously noisy, both mechanically and electrically, involve air hoses, fittings, oil and motors. In my NY house, the compressor --at one point a 1 HP 13 gallon monster-- was located in a walk-in closet adjacent to my listening room that had been fully sound-proofed.
        Here in Texas, I didn't have that option due to space. I am now using a slightly smaller 1/2 HP 6 gallon unit made by Sil-Air. I decided to build a silencer box, using a web article as the starting point. I made a number of modifications to the basic design- which was originally a simple box with an open bottom that dropped over the compressor. What I wound up with was far more elaborate. I used 1/2 inch particle board in two layers with healthy amount of green glue in between; the interior was lined with industrial melamine foam sheets, also layered with mass loaded vinyl in between. The bottom of the box was lined with a piece of barn stall mat to absorb vibration. I added side mount boxes, also lined with melamine foam to install intake fans at a 90 degree angle, a blower (output) fan is installed flush on the other side of the box. To access the compressor, I came up with a front "door" (also made of two layers of particle board and green glue, lined with melamine foam and mass loaded vinyl), that slots into the base at the front, and can be strapped tight by steel and rubber vibration tolerant latches. It can be sealed completely airtight with rubber gaskets around the door frame, though I found that latching only the bottom is sufficient-- you cannot hear anything in the listening room and the compressor never gets hot.
        The box probably weighs over 170 lbs. without the compressor. Ports, with appropriate sound proofing, allow for the power cord, airline output and temp controller wiring to route outside of the box. The thing fits beautifully under my stainless steel utility shelf in the record cleaning area, a room away from the listening room. It is dead quiet, has a temp controller with probe and digital panel to adjust settings for thermal control. I had a carpenter cut and assemble the box under my guidance so it is "do it with somebody else to do the hard work." Electrical power is supplied from an additional 20 amp dedicated line connected to the 'dirty power' of the main household system, i.e. not through the dedicated electrical subsystem for the hi-fi gear. I use a small isolation transformer shown in the lower left corner, to further isolate the compressor motor from the main household grid. Here are a few photos: Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0462.jpg Views:	1 Size:	260.4 KB ID:	75110Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCF0756.JPG Views:	1 Size:	846.1 KB ID:	75111

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        • Packgrog
          Packgrog commented
          Editing a comment
          That's very nice! I'd considered trying to build a silencer box for a DIY vacuum RCM, but I lucked into a good deal on a used Okki Nokki during a brief time that I had a little extra cash, so I skipped that process. What I had in mind wouldn't have been anywhere near as nice as this. Bravo!

      • #37
        Though I haven't yet, I am still hoping to build a KT88 amp some day, thinking of a pair of Oddblocks that come as a kit, but would prefer to to build something from scratch.
        Steve Lefkowicz
        Senior Associate Editor at Positive Feedback
        --------------------------------------------------------
        http://www.audionirvana.org/forum/ti...ounding-system

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        • #38
          I've DIY'ed countless sets of speakers (single driver units, 2-ways, FAST/WAW, and some 3 ways) and a few amps (Audio Sector, Velleman). I've pulled and refurbished a Packard Bell tube amp. Fun stuff. I've given a lot of thought to building an amp kit from ClassDAudio.com. I'd also like to build a tube amp from S5 Electronics down the road. I've done some repair on vintage equipment too.

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          • #39
            Given my severely limited funds (I'm probably way out of my depth even posting here, heh), I've had to do a little bit of modest DIY just to get going.

            I replaced the top shelf of my audio rack with 3/4" baltic birch to both strengthen and extend it. I mounted sanded-down mirror brackets on the side edges to help keep in place the AudioShield Prime Series Tabletop Cover that I bought from a friend.

            I damped the motor pod of my VPI Scout Jr motor with some strategically placed Herbie's Thin Grungebuster between the plates, and stacks of Big Fat Dots and Extra-Thick Grungebuster dots in place of the feet. This seems to help reduce motor vibration bleed nicely.

            Since the Phoenix Engineering products are so useful but so damned hard to find now, I built a DIY Arduino-based tachometer that interfaces with a Phoenix Falcon that I lucked into finding for the original list price. I'm unfortunately locked into using the 600RPM motor, and thus can never run multi-belt with an HRX pulley, but I never have to worry about speed accuracy again (my biggest gripe about the DC motor in my old Michell TecnoDec was between-session speed drift, and the hassle of readjusting it). Details on how to build one of these tachometers can be found on diyaudio.com.

            The other big DIY audio win for me was building my own rotation setup for an ultrasonic cleaning tank. I mounted a 5RPH (12 minutes per rotation) motor in a Radio Shack housing that kind of hooks into a stand made with a Makerbeam kit. Something like the Vinyl Stack Ultra Spin Kit would be a lot easier and less fiddly, but also three times the cost. I already spent more than I was comfortable with on the ultrasonic tank itself (Sonix IV ST136H 60kHz heated tank with drain). I still haven't gotten around to building the pump and 1 micron filter assembly as detailed in the epic diyaudio.com thread, but cleaning solution is cheap enough that it may not be that necessary. https://scontent-ort2-2.cdninstagram...04723595_n.mp4

            Apart from failed experiments (like trying to get a Technics SL-1200 to sound anywhere near as good as a modest belt drive, even with the same arm), that's about the extent of it. I've always felt a nagging temptation to try my hand at a Bottlehead kit, but both price and availability of cat-free soldering areas are limiting factors. Maybe some day!
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Packgrog; 01-30-2018, 01:31 PM.

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            • #40
              First DIY project is custom built stands for both turntable and open reel. Second was MK3 turntable plinth.

              I drew plans for stands and evolved the plinth with help from custom furniture builder that is part of my music group.

              The stands were inspired by my old Versa Dynamics turntable and the plinth influenced by Technics original design.


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              • #41
                Very nice work on the plinth Albert, beautifully done.
                https://zaxisaudio.com/

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                • #42
                  As of now into new caps for My amps and bypass caps. Too. So far gtteat results

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