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  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Lavigne View Post
    actually here in Seattle Silver Platters (3 locations) has more and more records, both new and used, every time I go there. and every time I'm there people are buying vinyl.

    but they have a business approach and have plenty of 'silver discs' and movies to run a business. although I appreciate an 'all-vinyl' approach I'm more interested in a sustainable business that will endure. and they appear to be thriving.

    Yes the sale of CDs and DVDs seems to pay the rent for the stores.

    What about the place at the Seattle airport that Ki tells me about where you can buy records? Now that's inventive.

    I thought the In Living Stereo approach where 3/4 of the store is audio gear and the other 1/4 is devoted to used LPs has possiblities (more than just carrying new vinyl like some high-end audio stores do). I think Art Dudley wrote about them in Stereophile a while ago.

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  • bpw
    replied
    Originally posted by MylesBAstor View Post


    See post #2.
    Duh, engage brain before keyboard ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • lasercd
    replied
    Myles part of the issue is that we've all gotten so deep into collecting that we are looking for needles in 100 haystacks and we are all looking for the same needles. I do all of my key purchases on Discogs and Ebay. Occasionally i'm able to source something from a shop in Japan.

    A store is as good as its buyer. It comes and goes in waves and all stores are subject to it. I can hit Academy Annex and find a bonanza. Next couple of trips nothing. I was at PREX yesterday and picked up a few odds and ends. Last few trips I may have walked out with 10 albums each visit. 30 years ago I used to cruise all the Manhattan shops three times a week. It wasn't a hell of a lot different. Of course the biggest difference now vs "the good old days" is pricing. $50 for a beat up copy of The Wall? Really?

    Most of the stores in Manhattan have migrated to the East Village and its hit or miss. More miss than hit. I do most of my shopping in the Philadelphia area. Here are my favorite shops that I visit with some frequency:

    Jupiter Records - 2 locations, Wilmington, DE and Woodbury Heights, NJ The owner used to work at PREX and has quite a bit of knowledge. He has a particular affection for prog rock (my specialty) and quite a number of rarities turn up at reasonable prices. The jazz selection at the Wilmington store is very impressive - lots of original Blue Notes. New arrivals seem to pour in endlessly. I spend a shit load of money at Jupiter.

    Long In The Tooth - center city Philadelphia. Kind of an odd store that I find very compelling. They continue to bring in some of the most interesting inventory you can imagine. I don't always buy something but you never know what you will find. I have lots of "WTF is this" moments when I flip through the bins. Two downsides - condition can be iffy and the owner loves to listen to himself talk. Great food in the area, including Shake Shack at the corner and Village Whiskey nearby.

    Beautiful World Syndicate - South Philly. Store has gone downhill but I pop in now and then and sometimes get a nice surprise. Condition is always a problem. Seems like the buyer never says no to anything brought in. Upside is pricing is very reasonable. You can find a good deal on a rare album hanging on the wall. They used to have an extensive jazz selection and one day it was all gone. Supposedly a dealer came through and bought out the section. They promised to repopulate it but its been anemic. Still...I go back like moth to flame because you just never know.

    OK my wildcard superstar store is Double Decker Records in Allentown, PA. Its been around for a long time but I've only been going there a couple of years. Who wants to schlep to Allentown? The city is a shithole and it takes me almost two hours to get there. These guys have it going on and every visit I drop $200-400. Prog, jazz, audiophile. Its all here. Lots of rarities and sometimes you can stumble on something that will make your jaw drop. Adjoining the store is a high end audio shop called Transparent Audio, run by Barry Konisberg, who is a member of PAAG (the Philadelphia audio group). One other benefit - also in Allentown and a 10 minute drive from the store is Shangy's, an incredible beer distributor. Its like walking into a warehouse of beer. Anyway…Double Decker is a lot of fun and well worth the trip.

    Many of these stores post rarities on Instagram. Double Decker is very proactive in this regard and will hold items for pick up (no mail order).

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Lavigne
    replied
    actually here in Seattle Silver Platters (3 locations) has more and more records, both new and used, every time I go there. and every time I'm there people are buying vinyl.

    but they have a business approach and have plenty of 'silver discs' and movies to run a business. although I appreciate an 'all-vinyl' approach I'm more interested in a sustainable business that will endure. and they appear to be thriving.

    Leave a comment:


  • allenh
    replied
    I still go to Princeton Records Exchange. Not perfect, but it is close to me. The classical section is pretty pathetic. You have to be lucky to find a good jewel or two there. Have much better luck online, like ePay.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    So--given how everyone likes to guard their favorite record store like Fort Knox--what is everyone's favorite record store?

    Sadly, I can't say I frequent any record stores in New York. I used to occasionally get to Academy Jazz on 12th St. but lately all they have are late pressing in dubious condition. I know that Academy classical on 17th St. basically puts anything of value up for sale on its eBay site. On the west side of 12th is Roses Second Hand Records that is essentially overpriced junk. On occasion I find something at In Living Stereo. Princeton Records is but a shell of itself. Classical is two boxes. More in the rock, jazz and arrivals sections but not near the quality of their heydey.

    Since I'm done with dumpster diving and garage sales, I've basically become an online scrounger.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    Originally posted by bpw View Post
    Did you happen to see the article about Jazz Record Mart in Chicago? Similar thing, the guy said the rent has spiked. He has to do something. Damn.

    See post #2.

    Leave a comment:


  • bpw
    replied
    Did you happen to see the article about Jazz Record Mart in Chicago? Similar thing, the guy said the rent has spiked. He has to do something. Damn.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    Originally posted by Ki Choi View Post
    Although I have bought LPs from my teen years, I am just now seriously getting back into playing the Black Disc and all the stores are closing... It's not just US thing. I see it in Japan and other countries in my travels.

    Have you been to the last remaining Tower Records store in Japan?

    I think people are selling LPs on line because it's becoming another edition Antique Roadshow. Everyone thinks their scratched up, peanut butter smudged, album is the next great treasure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ki Choi
    replied
    Although I have bought LPs from my teen years, I am just now seriously getting back into playing the Black Disc and all the stores are closing... It's not just US thing. I see it in Japan and other countries in my travels.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesBAstor
    replied
    And yet another one store is closing its doors due to the impossible commercial rents. Areas that you couldn't have given away ten or twenty years ago are now the hot areas.

    Gotta admit a little bit of me dies every time read a story like this. How sad is it in a city of 8 million people, there are hardly any records stores left in New York City? A Japanese restaurant, nail salon and two bars on every block. A Duane Reade and Starbucks every four blocks. Just like the street fairs where each block is an exact duplicate of the previous block.

    Princeton Record Exchange, the store that everyone went to at least once a month, is but a shell of its former self.

    Thank God for the online sources because I'm long done with dumpster diving and garage sale records.
    The Jazz Record Mart, long billed as "The World’s Largest Jazz and Blues Record Store," is up for sale while its founder searches for a possible new location.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ki Choi
    started a topic Wanna buy a record store?

    Wanna buy a record store?

    For those who have everything but the impressive LP collection, here's your chance to improve your status by buying this record store in Seattle that recently came up for sale @$850K:

    https://www.sonicboomrecords.com/

    Ki
    Last edited by Ki Choi; 01-29-2016, 05:31 PM.
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