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  • Cookware

    Cooking proficiency requires a number of things not the least of which--as I learned a while back--how to use a knife for preparation.

    A month or so ago, I needed to replace my tired and worn out Calphalon non-stick cooking pans. I looked around, did a little research and decided to switch to some All-Clad pans this time around.

    While I liked the Calphalon, over time the pans warped and for whatever the reason, the non-stick surface wore away. These new All Clad non-stick pans seem so much better than the old Calphalon. To begin with, the All Clad have a reinforced bottom that will hopefully prevent future warping (I have an electric range). But more so, this reinforced bottom seems to help with heat retention and distribution and I literally can cook scrambled eggs in the morning in a minute compared to several minutes with the Calphalon pans. It's like microwaving eggs.

    When I was shopping, I also ended up with what they call a "chefs" pan. Normally I would use a big skillet when I make chili. But in the end, I would always run out of space not to mention it was harder to put the lid on part way when simmering the chili. The "chefs" pan makes that issue a thing of the past. The "chefs" pan is part skillet, part wok shape and there's so much room in to make chili--not to mention anything like a small batch of spaghetti sauce, stroganoff, etc. Best purchase I've made in ages.
    Myles B. Astor, PhD, Administrator
    Senior Editor, Positive-Feedback.com
    ________________________________________

    -Zellaton Plural Evo speakers
    -Goldmund Telos 300 stereo amp
    -Goldmund Mimesis 37S Nextgen preamplifier
    -Doshi EVO and Goldmund PH3.8 phonostage
    -VPI Vanquish direct-drive turntable
    -VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy dual pivot tonearm, VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy gimballed and SAT LM-12 arm
    -Lyra Atlas SL Lambda, Fuuga Mk. 2, vdh Colibri Master Signature, MutechHayabusa, MOFI Master Tracker, Sumiko Songbird cartridges
    -Technics RS1506 with Flux Magnetic heads, Doshi V3.0 tape stage (balanced)
    -Assorted cables including Transparent XL Gen. 6, Skogrand, Viero, Kubala-Sosna, Audience Au24SX, Genesis Advanced Technologies and Ensemble Power Cords
    -Accessories including Stillpoint Aperture panels, Cathedral Sound panels, Furutech NCF Nano AC receptacles; Silver Circle Tchaik 6 PLC, Symposium ISIS and SRA Craz 3 racks, Audiodharma Cable Cooker, Symposium Ultra and assorted SRA OHIO Class 2.1+ platforms.

  • #2
    Good cookware and proper knives make a huge difference for those interested in the culinary arts. We are very lucky in that we have so many good quality brands to choose from. And options re material construction, handle design (comfort/ease of use), specialty vessels , shape, size and weight are endless. I was introduced to a small Canadian manufacturer out of Prince Edward Island (the fictional home of Anne of Green Gables) about 25 years ago named Paderno and have become a fan. I have so much of their cookware that it's placed in cupboards, a pantry and a shelving unit in the basement.

    The "chef's pan" is an awesome skillet-type unit and I use one frequently myself, although not for Chili. I make Chili in big batches so I use a 6.5L Dutch Oven.
    Dynavector DV20x2L MC cartridge - Genesis G7.1f speakers - Marantz Reference PM-KI-Pearl Int. Amp. - Oracle Audio Paris MkV turntable - Various Morrow & Valab/King cables

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Johnny Vinyl View Post
      Good cookware and proper knives make a huge difference for those interested in the culinary arts. We are very lucky in that we have so many good quality brands to choose from. And options re material construction, handle design (comfort/ease of use), specialty vessels , shape, size and weight are endless. I was introduced to a small Canadian manufacturer out of Prince Edward Island (the fictional home of Anne of Green Gables) about 25 years ago named Paderno and have become a fan. I have so much of their cookware that it's placed in cupboards, a pantry and a shelving unit in the basement.

      The "chef's pan" is an awesome skillet-type unit and I use one frequently myself, although not for Chili. I make Chili in big batches so I use a 6.5L Dutch Oven.
      Sounds more like Y-U-G-E batches.

      What ever happened to those Ginzu knives?
      Myles B. Astor, PhD, Administrator
      Senior Editor, Positive-Feedback.com
      ________________________________________

      -Zellaton Plural Evo speakers
      -Goldmund Telos 300 stereo amp
      -Goldmund Mimesis 37S Nextgen preamplifier
      -Doshi EVO and Goldmund PH3.8 phonostage
      -VPI Vanquish direct-drive turntable
      -VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy dual pivot tonearm, VPI 12-inch 3D Fat Boy gimballed and SAT LM-12 arm
      -Lyra Atlas SL Lambda, Fuuga Mk. 2, vdh Colibri Master Signature, MutechHayabusa, MOFI Master Tracker, Sumiko Songbird cartridges
      -Technics RS1506 with Flux Magnetic heads, Doshi V3.0 tape stage (balanced)
      -Assorted cables including Transparent XL Gen. 6, Skogrand, Viero, Kubala-Sosna, Audience Au24SX, Genesis Advanced Technologies and Ensemble Power Cords
      -Accessories including Stillpoint Aperture panels, Cathedral Sound panels, Furutech NCF Nano AC receptacles; Silver Circle Tchaik 6 PLC, Symposium ISIS and SRA Craz 3 racks, Audiodharma Cable Cooker, Symposium Ultra and assorted SRA OHIO Class 2.1+ platforms.

      Comment


      • #4
        All-Clad is the best. Been using it for years. They are not the Teflon version however.
        Christian
        System Gear

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MylesBAstor View Post

          Sounds more like Y-U-G-E batches.

          What ever happened to those Ginzu knives?
          My dad sent me a set of Ginzu knives about 35 years ago, and though we have a much better, proper knife set in the kitchen now, we still have have those Ginzus, and they still work. They just don't get used much anymore.
          Steve Lefkowicz
          Senior Associate Editor at Positive Feedback
          -
          Analog 1: Linn LP12 (MOSE/Hercules II), Ittok, Dynavector 10X5 MK.II Low, iPhono2/iPowerX; Analog 2: Pro-Ject RPM-1 Carbon, Talisman S, iFi iPhono.
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          Digital cables: Aural Symphonics USB, iFi Gemini twin-head USB.
          Accessories: Sound Organization turntable shelf, Mondo racks, Pangea Audio Vulcan rack, Pi Audio Group Über BUSS, Monster HTS2000 power conditioner, Kinetronics anti-static brush, Pro-Ject VC-S record cleaner, Spin Clean record cleaner.
          Headphones: Schiit Valhalla amp, Burson Conductor Virtuoso Amp, Meze Audio 99 Classic and 99 Neo, Beyerdynamic DT770Pro 600 ohm, DT770 Studio 80 ohm, 1More Triple Driver Over Ear, 1More Triple Driver IEM

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          • #6
            I have a rolerdex filled with fine cookware and some deliver too hahahhaa.
            analog stuff.
            otari mtr 10 2 track 1/4 made new by soren
            otari mtr 10 2 track 1/4 1/2 combo made new by soren
            sota sapphire used eminent tech ver 2 arm
            new sota nova table has magnetic levitation platter and full speed control and latest motor same arm as above
            thorens td124 sme ver 2 arm
            thorens td125 sme ver 2 arm
            kenwood direct drive sme ver 2 arm
            phono preamp Ml no 25 all re capped
            speakers cust infinity IRS V , new caps and LPS , magnets etc.
            mark levivson pre no 26 amps no 33
            digital three cust servers , win ser 2016 , AO
            Dacs lampi various

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            • #7
              My wife and I are still in love with the cookware we bought in Paris shortly before we got married. Link below, appears they have not changed in all these years.

              http://www.lecreuset.com/shop-by-materials/cast-iron/

              Comment


              • tom_hankins
                tom_hankins commented
                Editing a comment
                My wife and I have a nice collection of Le Creuset cookware, our favorites.

            • #8
              Originally posted by Albert Porter View Post
              My wife and I are still in love with the cookware we bought in Paris shortly before we got married. Link below, appears they have not changed in all these years.

              http://www.lecreuset.com/shop-by-materials/cast-iron/
              Love their Dutch ovens.
              Christian
              System Gear

              Comment


              • #9
                I own 9 different frying pans. There´s one for all occasions but my overall favourites are my deBuyer carbon steel pans.
                After a year of use it gets a beautiful patina and nothing sticks to it. But it must be handled with care and respect.

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                • #10
                  Knives? Well it´s the same deal. Carbon Steel. With a little work it gets a wicked edge. To wicked that I´m actually a little afarid of it ...
                  This is a picture of my Kamagata Usuba which is handforged by Shiro Kamu in Takefu, Japan.
                  Like all products worth owning they nedd care and respect.

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                  • #11
                    Love the All-Clad, but for the weight. Damn pans are heavy! Life-time cookware, and as you say even heat distribution. Love the big dutch oven for butternut squash soup (ok, for any soup) and the wok pan is terrific too, just heavy as hell. Could use a fatter handle to provide a better lever when lifting to dump the last bit out of the pan.

                    Along with high quality knives, one of the best kitchen purchases I've ever made was a good electric sharpener. Makes working with a keen edge easy as pie, and putting a fresh edge on takes seconds. Better ones run ~ $150 – $250, but worth every penny.

                    Attached Files
                    Etsuro Gold cartridge(mg), AMG v12 turntable w/ 12JT Turbo tonearm, bespoke LFD phono cable, CS Port C3EQM2 phono stage, dCS Rossini DAC, Roon ROCK, Audio Research Ref10 pre, Audio Research Ref160M amps, Wilson Alexia (v1) speakers. Transparent Ref MM2 & Gen5 signal, Ref MM2 speaker cables, Shunyata SigmaNR, Ztron Python power cables. Shunyata Hydra Triton v3, Stillpoints. HRS. Acoustic environment optimized by Dr. Bonnie Schnitta of SoundSense.

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                    • MylesBAstor
                      MylesBAstor commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Believe it or not, we still have one of those circa 1920 knife sharpening trucks that comes by the block periodically. As my cooking instructor said, no substitute for one of these guys to put a fine edge on your knife.

                      Another consideration at least for professional chefs, is warranty. Chefs do break knives and they use companies that quickly replace broken items.

                    • BadBob
                      BadBob commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I also like the electric when setting up table for a big dinner party, nice to put out razor sharp knifes with steaks or prime rib! Takes a few minutes to sharpen half dozen knifes.

                    • Per Sundell
                      Per Sundell commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yup your right. But to get the a stainless steel knife sharp enough for the tomatoes its fine.

                  • #12
                    I still can't understand adding photos, at least from my iPad!
                    Etsuro Gold cartridge(mg), AMG v12 turntable w/ 12JT Turbo tonearm, bespoke LFD phono cable, CS Port C3EQM2 phono stage, dCS Rossini DAC, Roon ROCK, Audio Research Ref10 pre, Audio Research Ref160M amps, Wilson Alexia (v1) speakers. Transparent Ref MM2 & Gen5 signal, Ref MM2 speaker cables, Shunyata SigmaNR, Ztron Python power cables. Shunyata Hydra Triton v3, Stillpoints. HRS. Acoustic environment optimized by Dr. Bonnie Schnitta of SoundSense.

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                    • MylesBAstor
                      MylesBAstor commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Easy. Use the button to the top left when posting, upload the photos and under the dialog box you should see a choice of picture sizes. Just click on each one for the desired size and you are set.

                  • #13
                    I'm pretty good using a steel for sharpening, but I bring my 8" and 10" Chef knives to a local place called KnifeWear.
                    Dynavector DV20x2L MC cartridge - Genesis G7.1f speakers - Marantz Reference PM-KI-Pearl Int. Amp. - Oracle Audio Paris MkV turntable - Various Morrow & Valab/King cables

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      I'm pan crazy. All-Clads are the daily drivers. I also have carbon steel now after which my cast irons no longer get used. The sear from a well seasoned carbon steel is hard to beat. As Per mentions though they need to be handled properly. Using anything acidic can strip away the hard earned layers. Aside from the sear, there ain't nuthin' like the flavor of a well seasoned pan be it a Wok at a Cantonese restaurant or a pan with history. Then theres the carbon steel crepe pan, two sizes for paelleras, you get the picture. At least cartridges are small!

                      Daily driver knifes are Kyocera Ceramics. They are very sharp and don't cost much. Downside is that they lack weight. For more delicate stuff I use Henkel's Miyabi line. European shapes with Japanese steel. These look great but I'm not too thrilled with how my hand wraps around. For quick chopping I like the feel of Globals better. Carvers are Wusthof Hollow-Ground. For those that like really thin slices of roasts I use a Bugatti salmon hollow my brother gave me for my birthday.

                      I used to have test tubes in a bain marie for sauces but now find it much easier to repurpose insulated stainless steel bottles from Hydroflask or Fifty/Fifty to keep them at temp be they coming of a sauce pan or a double boiler (All-clad). When I REALLY cook, I usually cook for between 8 and 14 people at a time. Typically three courses. I short cut on stocks and use a pressure cooker these days to get collagen out quickly. I sadly lack the time and patience for pristinely clear stocks. I just don't want to deal with the stress! LOL.

                      For stews my go to is a Dutch Oven by Le Crueset. Have a bunch of baby ramekins with tops too for hot sides like truffle cream corn or even soups.

                      Friends say the only room that rivals my music room for gadgetry is my kitchen, I say no not really. If I had a salamander and a cold smoker to go along with the multiple immersion cookers as well as that new custom sealed bricker I've ordered, maybe...

                      Best cheap tool? The award has gotta go to my little Krups coffee grinder. Toast some toasted pepper corns, toasted seeds, heck even throw in dried mushrooms like porcini or morel and you can really make for some exciting spice mixes to dust or rub.

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                      • #15
                        Sadly, I like Mauviel cookware, especially the all copper sauce pan. Requires careful treatment though. Beautiful to look at and a bit pricey.

                        I do have some antique Lodge cast iron pans and a Dutch Oven, much better than the new stuff because the grain structure is much finer. One thing I am experimenting with is polishing down the interior of a new cast iron pan to a much finer finish. The new stuff is difficult to clean without damaging the seasoning.

                        Knives are primarily Henckels (NOT the cheap imports) though my sharpest are ancient hollow ground Chicago Cutlery carbon steel which take a razor edge but the shapes are not as useful.

                        I've been trying a large pan with a ceramic non stick coating but like most new stuff it's not very thick and I prefer some weight to cookware. Otherwise I like it. Still nothing sears like cast iron.

                        Some of my favorite pans are old Revere ware, very heavy stainless with a very thick copper bottom from back when good stuff was produced domestically. There is very little on the modern market anything like them anymore and I've looked. All Clad is about as close as one can get now days.

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